Faith-Based Physics

theory-of-relativity-486718_1280When I enrolled at Rice University, I thought I would dual-major in math and physics en route to a Ph.D. in physics, a university professorship, and a career relishing the life of the mind in the esoteric realms of the subatomic. No, I had known that I would do that since sometime in middle school.

Within a semester, I had doubts that my career path lay in academic physics. By the end of my freshman year, I knew pure physics was not for me; I was considering biophysics, physical chemistry, and other, physics-adjacent disciplines. By the end of my third semester, no majors involving the name “physics” were even on my radar. I ended up, after some soul-searching and a year of exploration and reflection, settling on majors in math and religious studies, the latter with a concentration in Judaism.

Why? It wasn’t that I had lost my interest in physics as a subject; I still haven’t. It wasn’t my grades. It wasn’t even that I was unhappy with the work I was doing.

What really drove me off was this: I found that the kind of physics I wanted to do—the cutting-edge, theoretical stuff—was disturbingly full of hand-waving. That is, the really tough problems were either ignored entirely or roundly dismissed as inconsequential, even if they had potentially huge significance for the entire field. These were problems in which no one was doing any serious investigation—indeed, serious investigation might not even be possible under the current state of the art—but “we” supposedly “knew” something was true. Nine times out of ten, statements of this sort were literally accompanied by hand-waving by the professor or teacher’s assistant making the statement. In at least one incident, I witnessed a Nobel laureate brush off a series of hard-hitting questions in precisely this manner.

This is not to say that no one ever attempted to explain such things. Usually, the explanation was a deus ex machina based on the “standard model” or an appeal to authority. The thinking seemed to be this: If you don’t know the answer, just refer vaguely to the standard model, Einstein, Heisenberg, or Feynman, and the troublesome freshman/sophomore/high-schooler will get the idea that he or she is out of his or her depth and leave you alone. Even if the question was perfectly reasonable. There’s no grant money for investigating pesky “side effects” that show up in 200-level labs but that we can’t explain. “No grant money” means “forget about it.”

With all of the latest buzz about the so-called “multiverse” and, relatedly, parallel universes, at least a few of my beefs with academic physics have gone mainstream. In particular, Rod Dreher has posted an excellent piece about the faith of the physics academy. Some key quotes:

Physicists have a nerve. I know one (I’ll call him Mark) who berates every religious person he meets, yet honestly thinks there exist parallel universes, exactly like our own, in which we all have two noses. He refuses to give any credit to Old Testament creation myths and of course sneers at the idea of transubstantiation. But, without any sense of shame, he insists in the same breath that humans are made from the fallout of exploded stars; that it is theoretically possible for a person to decompose on one side of a black hole and recompose on the other, and that there are diamonds in the sky the size of the moon.

. . . .

I have never quite understood why the “many-universes” theory is considered science, not religion. How could you ever falsify the thesis?

. . . . We assume that the Scientist must know what he’s talking about no matter what he says, because he has studied his field, and is committed to a rigorous methodology and epistemology that rules out what cannot be known empirically. If a Scientist says it, it must be true, because it has either been proven experimentally, or can be.

. . . .

. . . . [C]ertainty in the sense of probability is not the same thing as necessary being: If I toss a coin, it is certain that I will get heads or tails, but that outcome depends on my tossing the coin, which I may not necessarily do. Likewise, any particular universe may follow from the existence of a multiverse, but the existence of the multiverse remains to be explained. In particular, the universe-generating process assumed by some multiverse theories is itself contingent because it depends on the action of laws assumed by the theory. The latter might be called meta-laws, since they form the basis for the origin of the individual universes, each with its own individual set of laws. So what determines the meta-laws? Either we must introduce meta-meta-laws, and so on in infinite regression, or we must hold that the meta-laws themselves are necessary — and so we have in effect just changed our understanding of what the fundamental universe is to one that contains many universes. In that case, we are still left without ultimate explanations as to why that universe exists or has the characteristics it does.

When it comes to such metaphysical questions, science and scientific speculation may offer much in fleshing out details, but they have so far failed to offer any explanations that are fundamentally novel to philosophy — much less have they supplanted it entirely.

Read the whole thing.

 

 

Jumper Cables for the Mind

Here’s one way to get those juices flowing: Jumper Cables for the Mind – NYTimes.com.  We’re already concerned about people enhancing their ability to access and process information using tools like Google Glass, and it’s already well-known that everyday activities like drinking a cup of coffee can enhance mental performance.  Now, we’re going to have to watch out for people with electrodes stuck to their heads.,,

On a related note, you might head over to Lumosity.com if you’re interested in some (non-electrifying) mental stimulation.

Fascinating New Brain Research

Researchers have observed never-before-detected brain activity in deep coma states.  This has obvious implications for end-of-life decisions, but also (as the article points out) for trauma patients who are placed into comas for medical reasons.  Very interesting stuff.

How to Lose an Election

Bill Clinton says, “We just have to slow down our economy” to fight global warming. This is the same guy who swept into office on James Carville’s mantra that it’s “the economy, stupid,” right? Is the Clinton campaign even looking at polls like this one? This one?

Ethanol’s Dirty Side

According to this report to the California Air Resources Board, total ethanol emissions actual surpass fossil fuel emissions. Hat tip to JunkScience.com Blog.

Everything You Never Heard About DDT

DDT info on JunkScience.com. See also the Malaria Clock.

Nanocars. This is Just Cool.

Drs. James Tour and Kevin Kelly of Rice University have built the world’s first single-molecule nanocar. This is just cool. Dr. Tour is awesome.

Junk Science – Global Warming Blues

Junk Science – Global Warming Blues on FoxNews.com. For more good and honest evaluation of the evidence for and against various possible climate changes – warmer, colder, whatever – check out JunkScience.com.

You might also find Michael Crichton’s State of Fear interesting.

Let the Uproar Begin

The Kansas Board of Education, voting 6-4, has approved a science curriculum for public schools which incorporates information about the “intelligent design” arguments on human origins and highlights problems with contemporary evolutionary theory. This is bound to create a massive uproar, of course; I won’t dive into any of the issues, here, but I thought it deserved a mention.

If you are unfamiliar with the intelligent design argument or have only heard the way it is presented in the news, you owe it to yourself to read Michael Behe’s book Darwin’s Black Box. Whatever the debate, whatever side you’re on, you should be familiar with the best argument for each side’s claims before commenting, yourself, and Behe’s book presents about the best explication of intelligent design around.